Ministers must quickly ban LGBT+ conversion therapy

Campaigners have accused the government of not moving quickly enough towards banning LGBT+ “conversion therapy” in England and Wales.

MPs from across the political spectrum called during a Westminster debate for the practice to be made illegal.

Equalities minister Kemi Badenoch said the government was “committed” to “ending” it, and took the issue “very seriously”.

But equality campaigners and some MPs said targeted action was needed.

“Conversion therapy” refers to any form of treatment or psychotherapy which aims to change a person’s sexual orientation, ranging from electric shock treatment to religious teaching and discussion.

The practice is already outlawed in Switzerland and parts of Australia, Canada and the US.

MPs from across the political spectrum backed a similar ban for England and Wales during a debate in Parliament’s Westminster Hall, prompted by a petition signed by more than 250,000 people.

They called on the government to produce a timeline for legislation.

Former Scotland Secretary David Mundell – the Conservative Party’s first openly gay cabinet minister – said conversion therapy “could not be tolerated”.

He added the government had “given the impression of being tardy” and now was “the time to end that impression”.

Several MPs spoke of LGBT+ people who had been “left with scars” from the experience – with some taking their own lives.

Some had been told to starve themselves, been strapped to wooden chairs and been given electric shocks, while being gay had been referred to as the “the deceit of Satan”.

The SNP’s Hannah Bardell said a friend of hers had revealed their experience of the practice, which led them to attempting suicide at the age of 12.

Labour’s Angela Eagle called conversion therapy “medieval”, “degrading” and “dehumanising”.

And Tory MP Elliot Colburn said: “With every day that passes, there is another person at risk at being subject to this degrading treatment and we risk losing even more lives of people who feel there is no other way out.”

The petition which prompted the debate said running conversion therapy treatments should be made a criminal offence, as well as forcing people to attend or sending them abroad for them.

Boris Johnson said in July that the practice was “absolutely abhorrent” and that plans for a “ban” would be brought forward.

The government commissioned research into the ban – which was first proposed by Theresa May in 2018 – but ministers have yet to publish details.

Responding to the Westminster Hall debate, Ms Badenoch said: “I want to assure you that we are committed to ending conversion therapy in the UK and we take this issue very seriously.

“This practice has no place in civilised society”.

A “robust criminal law framework” was in place to deal with the worst examples, the minister said, adding that people could face charges such as rape or grievous bodily harm in some cases.

But Ms Badenoch said the government did not want to stop those who “seek spiritual counselling as they explore their sexual orientation”.

Afterwards, the Ozanne Foundation, which campaigns against discrimination based on sexuality, said: “The UK government has constantly dragged its feet on taking any meaningful action, allowing perpetrators to flourish during their continued silence.

“The response from the minister told us nothing new.”

It added that there could be “no hope of ending conversion therapy without a ban”.

And Nancy Kelley, chief executive of Stonewall, said it was “very disappointing to have so little movement from government, with no clear pathway to a ban or timescale for implementation”.

MPs call for speedy ban on LGBT+ conversion therapy

MPs from several parties have called for LGBT+ conversion therapy to be banned after thousands of people signed a petition on Parliament’s website.

In a Westminster debate, they heard stories of “medieval” and “harmful” practices which continue to be used.

The government said it was “committed” to “ending” attempts to suppress gender identity or sexual orientation.

But campaigners say they are still waiting for action, with people being exposed to psychological trauma.

The term “conversion therapy” refers to any form of treatment or psychotherapy which aims to change a person’s sexual orientation, ranging from electric shock treatment to religious teaching and discussion.

The practice is already outlawed in Switzerland and parts of Australia, Canada and the US.

MPs from across the political spectrum backed the ban during a debate in Parliament’s Westminster Hall, and called on the government for a timeline for the legislation.

Former Scotland Secretary David Mundell – the Conservative Party’s first openly gay cabinet minister – said the practice “could not be tolerated”.

He added: “Whilst I am sure that the government’s intentions are positive… the government has given the impression of being tardy and now is the time to end that impression.”

Many MPs spoke of of LGBT+ people who had been “left with scars” from the experience – as well as those who had taken their own lives.

Examples of the practice included people being told to starve themselves, being strapped to wooden chairs and being given electric shocks, while being gay was referred to as the “the deceit of Satan”.

The SNP’s Hannah Bardell said a friend of hers had revealed their experience of the practice, which led them to attempting suicide at the age of 12.

E-petitions are a way for members of the public to influence what is debated in Parliament.

Anyone can start a petition, as long as they are a British citizen or a UK resident.

When a petition passes 100,000 signatures, it is considered for debate by a cross-party committee of MPs.

Labour’s Angela Eagle called conversion therapy “medieval” and a “degrading and dehumanising practice”.

She said a ban should be an “obvious non-contentious step” to tackle “mistaken beliefs”, such as LGBT+ people being “a threat to society, that they are evil or disordered, that LGBT+ are ill or sick or can be cured”.

And Tory MP Elliot Colburn said: “We are not here talking about harmful practices that occurred some time ago. This is happening right here in the UK right now.”

He added: “With every day that passes, there is another person at risk at being subject to this degrading treatment and we risk losing even more lives of people who feel there is no other way out.

“As a gay man myself, and on behalf of LGBT+ people in the UK and around the world, [I want to say] we are here, our existence is real, our lives are valid and we cannot and do not need to be cured.”

The petition, which attracted more than 250,000 signatures, said running conversion therapy treatments in the UK should be made a criminal offence, as well as forcing people to attend or sending them abroad for them.

Boris Johnson said in July that the practice was “absolutely abhorrent” and had “no place in this country”.

The government commissioned research into the band – which was first proposed by Theresa May in 2018 – but ministers have yet to publish details.

In December, more than 370 religious leaders from around the world added their voice to calls to outlaw the practice.

Responding to the Westminster Hall debate, Equalities Minister Kemi Badenoch said: “I want to assure you that we are committed to ending conversion therapy in the UK and we take this issue very seriously.”

She added that “this practice has no place in civilised society” it was “shocking to think” it still went on.

A “robust criminal law framework” was in place to deal with the worst examples, the minister said, adding that people could face charges such as rape or grievous bodily harm in some cases.

But Ms Badenoch said the government did not want to stop those who “seek spiritual counselling as they explore their sexual orientation”.

Google HR suggested medical leave for racism victims

Google advised employees in the US who complained about racism and sexism to take medical leave and undergo mental health counselling, NBC News says.

One current employee reportedly said going on medical leave is a “normalised” event after “unproductive” talks to human resources about racism.

Two leading AI ethics researchers, who had campaigned on diversity issues, said they were fired by the company.

Google denies wrongdoing, and said it “rigorously” investigates complaints.

“We have a well-defined process for how employees can raise concerns and we work to be extremely transparent about how we handle complaints,” the company said in a statement.

“We take firm action against employees who violate our policies.”

One former staff member, Benjamin Cruz, told NBC News that they had complained to HR in 2019 after being told by a colleague that their skin was much darker than the co-worker expected.

“After I made that complaint, my work started getting pushed out from under me, but my team acted like everything was fine,” they told NBC.

“When the medical leave was recommended to me, it was like an automatic process.”

Another former employee said: “I can think of 10 people that I know of in the last year that have gone on mental health leave because of the way they were treated.”

In all, NBC’s investigation is said to have covered nearly a dozen first-hand employee accounts of similar experiences.

That includes Timnit Gebru and Margaret Mitchell, the two AI ethics researchers who lost their jobs last year.

Dr Gebru, whose firing led to an international wave of criticism of Google and widespread support from her colleagues, also said she had been encouraged to make use of “therapy resources”.

Dr Mitchell, a co-leader of the Google ethics AI team who openly supported Dr Gebru before her own firing, wrote on Twitter that the NBC investigation reflected what had happened to her.

She said that while the topic was “painful to read and relive”, it was an “incredible pinpoint of a hidden reality”.

Google is not the only major technology firm accused of failing to implement much-hyped diversity and inclusion policies.

Reuters news agency reported last week on an investigation into Facebook by a US agency concerned about possible “systemic” racial bias in hiring and promotions at the firm.

Four rejected applicants for jobs are said to have complained. But the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in the US is investigating whether Facebook company policies are effectively discriminating against some staff on a larger scale.

Facebook spokesman Andy Stone declined to comment on the status of the probe, or specific allegations, but said that “it is essential to provide all employees with a respectful and safe working environment”.

“We take any allegations of discrimination seriously and investigate every case,” he told Reuters.

The investigation is ongoing, and no accusations have been levelled against Facebook by the agency.

Woman sentenced after drowning dog tied to rock in Nottinghamshire

A woman who “failed to act” when her pet dog was thrown into a river with a heavy rock tied around its neck has been given a community order.

German shepherd-type dog Bella is now “doing well” after being saved from the Trent in Nottinghamshire a year ago.

A court heard Charlene Latham pleaded with her ex-partner Leigh Johnson not to drown Bella, but he refused and she did not get help.

Latham was sentenced but the charge against Mr Johnson was dropped.

Nottingham Magistrates’ Court heard Latham had previously pleaded guilty to causing unnecessary suffering to a protected animal near Long Lane, Farndon.

Mr Johnson, 33, who was charged with the same offence, denied the accusation, and the court was told the case against him was dropped as the RSPCA said it did not have enough evidence.

The court heard Latham, 32, of Bentinck Close, Ollerton, drove Mr Johnson and Bella down to the river on 6 January 2020, but did not know of his intentions, and she “pleaded with him” not to do it.

A plastic bag containing a rock weighing 34.7kg (77lb) was tied to a lead around Bella’s neck, magistrates heard.

Dog walker Jane Harper was walking her own pets when she spotted the animal.

She told the BBC Bella had managed to rest her head on a rock to breathe while the rest of her body was submerged in the water.

Mrs Harper, who with friends pulled 11-year-old Bella from the water, said: “I honestly don’t know how she survived. She was just a dead weight. She was in a terrible state.

“I was trying to talk to her and lift her out, but she wasn’t responding. It was a real struggle and we had to call others to get her out because of the weight.”

Latham lied to the police about what happened to Bella, the court heard, after being put “under pressure” from Mr Johnson who was “aggressive and controlling”, but she later admitted her involvement and pleaded guilty to the charge.

Luc Chignell, defending Latham, said: “The person who committed this is not here and that is not her fault.”

Latham has since suffered “relentless abuse” on social media, which led to police advising her to leave her home, the court heard.

Magistrates were told she was now living in Devon.

Mr Chignell said: “There is a big difference between failing to act and doing it yourself.

“She was five months’ pregnant at the time and would not have been able to throw a rock into the river.

“It was not her intention to harm Bella…. she did not stand up for the dog as she should have.”

Harry Bowyer, prosecuting, said: “This is someone who left that dog in the river and did not seek any attempt to get help, and lied to the police when they came round the next morning.”

A vet who examined Bella said had she not been treated when she was, she would have died.

Ella Carpenter, manager at the Radcliffe Animal Centre, said they were now keen to find Bella a new home, which needed to be near the centre due to her complex needs.

Latham was given a 12-month community order and told to pay an £80 fine, £32 victim surcharge, and £200 in costs.

She was also banned from keeping dogs for three years.

EuroMillions winner looking for sons teddy before fatal crash

A lottery winner caused a fatal crash when he took his eyes off the road to find his young son’s teddy bear, a court was told.

Matthew Topham, 31, who scooped a £45m EuroMillions jackpot in 2012, had reached into the back of his BMW to find the “upset” two year-old’s toy.

Lincoln Crown Court heard he veered into another car’s path, killing Mary Jane Regler, 75.

Mr Topham denies causing death by dangerous driving.

Jurors heard Mr Topham, who had been visiting his wife’s family, took his eyes off the road “for up to three seconds” before the crash at North Cockerington, Lincolnshire, on 25 December 2019.

Prosecutor Michael Cranwell-Brown said it was “accepted that the collision was entirely the fault of this defendant”.

“His attention was diverted from the road as he was looking behind him to retrieve his two-year-old son’s teddy bear,” he said.

He looked back into the footwell to try and find it, Mr Cranwell Brown said, before returning his attention to the road.

Mr Topham, who had crossed into the opposite carriageway, later told officers at the crash scene he had attempted to take evasive action but “it was all to no avail”.

Mrs Regler died from chest injuries while her husband Rodney was seriously injured.

The prosecutor said it was “significant” that Mr Topham told police during interviews that “it was out of character to do what he did.”

Concluding his opening remarks, Mr Cranwell-Brown said the child’s upset was “irrelevant” and Mr Topham “knew that it would not be safe driving along a road and not looking where he was going”.

“He could not just plough on,” he said.

More news from across Lincolnshire

Mr Topham of Swinderby, Lincolnshire, denies causing death by dangerous driving and causing serious injury by dangerous driving.

He has admitted causing death by careless driving.

The trial continues.

Florence Price: Forgotten work by pioneering composer rediscovered

A forgotten work by the pioneering composer Florence Price has been rediscovered and performed for the first time in nearly 80 years.

Price made history in 1933 when she became the first African-American woman to have a symphony performed by a major US orchestra, in Chicago.

But her work faded into obscurity after her death in 1953.

Much of it was thought to be lost, until a cache of music was found in her former summer house in Chicago in 2009.

Musicologist Samantha Ege has spent the past two years trawling through those archives to reconstruct her solo piano pieces. Among them was Fantasie Nègre No 3 in F Minor, which was long presumed to be incomplete.

“The music just ended after two pages really abruptly,” Ege told the BBC. She made it her mission to find the missing pieces in Price’s archive, which is now held in the University of Arkansas.

The problem was that, while the piece starts in F minor, the second page ends in a different key – A♭ major.

Using Price’s previous compositions as a template, Ege assumed the Fantasie would return to the original key in its closing passages.

“I tried to imagine where the music could go,” she said. “But I didn’t have a piano [in the archives] so I was really just trying to work it all out in my head.”

The eureka moment came when Ege realised Price “had more to say” in the second key of A♭ major.

She quickly found pages of manuscript that seemed match the first two sheets of Fantasie Nègre No 3 just “gathering dust” in a box on a shelf.

She wasn’t convinced of her breakthrough until she went home and tried the piece out on her piano.

“When I was playing through the music and it was under my fingers it just felt magical. It felt that history was coming to life,” she told BBC arts correspondent Rebecca Jones.

“I sort of had chills thinking about the fact that I am hearing this music for the first time in this century.”

Ege subsequently recorded the piece – the first time it has been committed to tape – for a new CD, Fantasie Nègre – The Piano Music of Florence Price.

It was released on Monday, International Women’s Day, alongside recordings of Price’s other Fantasies and various “sketches and snapshots” that Ege found in the archive.

“Each one takes various ideas from a black folkloric musical tradition and blends [them] with the late 19th Century Romantic tradition,” she said. “The first Fantasy Nègre is based on a spiritual, Please Don’t Let This Harvest Pass… and I think of each one as different chapters in a very elaborate novel.

“Even though they were never published during her lifetime, she wrote them down and noted that they were some of her most worthy compositions, and so it’s really moving to be able to bring that together and perform them together.”

Ege’s work is the latest chapter in the rediscovery and reappraisal of Price’s work.

She was born Florence Smith in 1887 in Little Rock, Arkansas, to a dentist father and piano teacher mother, who encouraged her to take up the instrument.

She went on to study at the New England Conservatory of Music, one of the few music schools to accept black students at the time, and earned two diplomas in piano and organ. By 1910, she was head of the music department at Clark Atlanta University in Atlanta, Georgia.

In 1912, she married Thomas J Price and they moved back to her home town – but racial tensions were on the rise and, after a public lynching in 1927, the family moved to Chicago.

When her husband struggled to find work, the couple divorced, but Price retained her married name and made ends meet by teaching piano, playing the organ for silent film screenings and writing advertising jingles under the name Vee Jay.

At the same time, she started entering composing competitions, winning several prizes. Her big break came in 1932, when her First Symphony won the orchestral category in the Wanamaker Music Composition Contest. That caught the attention of conductor Frederick Stock, who premiered the symphony with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra the following year.

Despite that success, she often struggled to get her music played in a more sexist and segregated era. It was a problem she acknowledged in a 1943 letter to the music director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Serge Koussevitzky, asking him to consider performing her music.

“I have two handicaps,” she wrote. “I am a woman and I have some Negro blood in my veins.”

She continued to write, and her music was performed in concert halls in Detroit, Michigan, and Brooklyn, New York.

The contralto Marian Anderson also sang Price’s arrangement of My Soul’s Been Anchored in De Lord as the closing song of her historic concert at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington DC in 1939.

After her death in 1953, Price’s music was largely overlooked by the classical music establishment, but her reputation was preserved by black musicians and newspapers, which championed her legacy.

The discovery of her archive in 2009 helped bring her music to wider audiences again, with BBC Radio 3 dedicating a five-part documentary to her story last year.

Ege said there were many more works in Price’s repertoire that remain to be recorded and publicised – and with the first festival dedicated to the composer due to take place later this year, she hopes her place in the classical music canon will be maintained.

“These pieces now need to be performed, and we need to hear them, so that we can we can appreciate Florence Price today, not just in terms of her history, but in terms of the works and the artistry that she created,” she said.

Tottenham stabbings: One dead and two injured near White Hart Lane station

A 19-year-old man has died and another teenager is in hospital after a stabbing in Tottenham, north London.

Three men were attacked shortly before 14:00 GMT on Penshurst Road near White Hart Lane station, the Met Police said.

Air ambulance crews treated the 19-year-old victim but he was pronounced dead at the scene.

A second man, aged 18, was taken to hospital with stab wounds, while a third victim suffered minor injuries, police said.

A spokeswoman for the London Ambulance Service said: “We sent two ambulance crews, three medics in cars and an incident response officer to the scene. We also dispatched London’s Air Ambulance.

“Sadly, despite the efforts of medics, a man died at the scene. A second man was treated and taken to a major trauma centre.”

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Climate change: Kerry urges top polluters to cut emissions now

US climate change envoy John Kerry has urged the world’s top 20 polluters which create 81% of emissions between them to reduce CO2 immediately.

He was speaking after meeting Prime Minister Boris Johnson and other senior UK figures in London to plan two upcoming international climate summits.

He praised the UK for phasing out coal, and for its “ambitious” climate goals.

But he told BBC Newsnight that the UK – along with other major nations – must deliver their proposed emissions cuts.

“China, the US, Russia, India, the EU, Korea, Japan and others all have to be part of this effort,” he said. “Twenty countries. Eighty one percent of the emissions.”

Asked during the interview whether the UK should be planning a controversial new coal mine in Cumbria, he replied: “The marketplace has made a decision that coal is not the future.

“All over the world people have made a decision to move to cleaner fuel than coal, which is the dirtiest fuel in the world. In America and elsewhere …most banks will tell you we’re not going to fund a new coal plant.”

Earlier after talks with Mr Johnson and other senior ministers, Mr Kerry hailed the UK as a “strong partner” in the fight to safeguard the planet.

And the prime minister said the two countries had an “exciting shared agenda” in driving down global emissions in the run-up to November’s COP 26 UN summit in Glasgow.

Mr Kerry, a former US Secretary of State appointed to the role by Mr Biden in November, spent several hours in Downing Street with Alok Sharma, the cabinet minister who is chairing November’s gathering.

Mr Kerry was also due to meet other senior UK figures, including Chancellor Rishi Sunak, Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab, and Business Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng.

On Tuesday, climate diplomacy sees him in Paris and Brussels for talks with European leaders, who have been praised for their recent target to cut emissions 55% on 1990 levels.

Leaders are wrestling with gloomy news from China, whose recent five-year plan takes tiny steps to decarbonisation.

But they will be heartened by President Biden’s $1.9 trillion stimulus package agreed by the Senate, which will support “green” economic growth.

There is positive news too, from Brazil, which – under US pressure – says its previous stance blocking climate talks was misunderstood.

Monday’s meetings may go some way to helping the UK focus its objectives for the November gathering.

Ministers were accused recently by MPs on the Business and Energy Select Committee of failing to set clear goals.

The committee said the key areas identified by the UK for action – adaptation and resilience; nature based solutions; energy transitions; clean transport and switching the finance system to low-carbon investments – were too broad and “without clear measures for success”.

It said more focus needed to be given to the “overriding necessity” of agreeing deliverable policies that keep global temperature rises to as close to 1.5C as possible.

Nick Mabey, from the think tank e3g, told the BBC there was the potential to achieve multiple goals – including banning new coal power plants, ending banks’ fossil fuel investment and supporting poorer nations to adapt – and that these should be debated publicly.

“This debate is up for grabs” he said. “It should be a public debate because we’re talking out how to change whole economies. A lot of the outcomes from Glasgow will be decided in the court of public opinion.”

John Kerry’s meetings with the UK politicians who will be running the COP26 summit may help bring some much-needed clarity to efforts on this side of the Atlantic.

But he will also be assessing just how much political capital Team Biden should invest in Team Boris.

So far, the messaging from the UK on what COP26 can realistically achieve has been muddled. If every country is going to put a new climate plan on the table before Glasgow, what’s the actual point of the meeting?

Mr Kerry will also be assessing how much diplomatic heavy lifting he should undertake on behalf of the Brits.

To give Glasgow a chance, both India and China will have to come up with significant advances on their current actions on carbon.

Others, including the Saudis and the Brazilians, will have to show flexibility. Kerry’s involvement may be critical in delivering these outcomes.

But his impression of the British effort will also influence events back home. President Biden is organising a climate summit of world leaders for 22 April.

That meeting may become the bigger focus for the US if Kerry takes a dim view of UK’s efforts on the COP.

Follow Roger on Twitter @rharrabin

Eccentric Bristol house with built-in pipe organ is sold

A four-bedroom “charismatic and eccentric” terraced house has been sold – with a full organ built into the fabric of the building.

The house in Cliftonwood, Bristol, was put on the market after the previous owner died last year.

Joan Baker, 98, was an organist at the local church. Her husband made the organ, which has pipes going through the landing into one of the bedrooms.

Organist Anna Lapwood said it was “so unusual” to find a house like this.

Mrs Baker, who played the organ at Holy Trinity Church, moved into the house in the 1940s. Her husband, Ronald, and his brother, built the instrument so she could practise at home.

Her neighbour, Dick Willis, said: “She would sit there on the half-landing and play the organ and her husband Ronald would stand on the half-landing below and play the trumpet.

“She was just the most extraordinary person. She died at the age of 98 and had been desperate to make it to 100.

“She had lived in that house since she was 21. She was very much the street granny. She had a great sense of humour. She was just lovely, very sociable.”

The organ, which has not been played in several years, is on top of the stairs, but the pipes go all the way around the landing.

“The base pipe and the pump are in the top bedroom and Ronald knocked through the two cupboards in the two top rooms and made a seating area across the stairwell which is where the keyboard, the foot pedals and the treble pipes are,” he said.

“So if you go up the house it dominates the place.”

Ms Lapwood, who is also a conductor and BBC presenter, said she was stunned when she saw the property online.

“Immediately I thought ‘Oh my gosh – this is amazing’,” she said.

“It is pretty unusual to find an actual pipe organ built into the house in the way it is in this case.

“I sort of thought it’s just the dream house. It makes a massive difference to be able to practise whenever you want in the middle of the day instead of trekking to the church where it is also very cold.

“It has to be in the top 10 houses I’ve ever seen… and I just think it’s such a lovely story.”

But it is likely the organ has played its last tune, with property experts expecting it to be removed to create more space.

Estate agent James Bailey from Allen and Harris, who sold the house, said: “It is the first time in my 20-year property career that I have bought to market and agreed a home with a full-scale church organ.”

He said Cliftonwood and neighbouring Clifton had lots of houses “steeped in history”.

Sarah Everard: Police speak to over 750 people as search continues

Detectives searching for a missing woman last seen five days ago have “spoken to over 750 people” for information.

Sarah Everard was last spotted on CCTV walking alone in Clapham, south London, along the A205 Poynders Road, from the junction with Cavendish Road, in the direction of Tulse Hill.

Police have received more than 100 calls from the public since Wednesday.

The Met said efforts to find Ms Everard continue “at pace”.

Det Ch Insp Katherine Goodwinsaid: “This is definitely a missing person investigation at the moment, but I remain open-minded as to all possibilities in the investigation.

“We are currently knocking on doors. We’ve spoken to over 750 different people and addresses have been visited.”

Ms Everard was last seen at about 21:30 GMT on Wednesday – 30 minutes after she had left her friend’s home in Leathwaite Road, Clapham.

Her walk home to Brixton was expected to have taken her 50 minutes.

Police said it was unclear whether she returned to her home address but think she may have walked across Clapham Common.

The 33-year-old’s family said it was “totally out of character” for her to not be in contact with them.

Det Ch Insp Goodwin urged people to check any dashcam or doorbell cameras for sightings of her, particularly along these roads: