Death of two-year-old in Edinburgh suspicious

Detectives have named a two-year-old boy who died in suspicious circumstances in Edinburgh.

Lucasz Czapla was found with serious injuries after the alarm was raised in the Muirhouse area at about 09:30 on Saturday.

He was pronounced dead at the scene a short time later.

On Monday Lucasz Czapla, 40, appeared before Edinburgh Sheriff Court charged with assault following the toddler’s death.

Mr Czapla was also charged with driving over the alcohol limit, dangerous driving and failing to stop a vehicle.

He made no plea and was remanded in custody.

Police Scotland have since confirmed the death is being treated as suspicious following a post-mortem examination.

A force spokeswoman said inquires were ongoing.

Amazon sorry for Sidewalk confusion

Amazon has apologised after UK customers received an email announcing the launch of a service available in the US only.

Amazon Sidewalk uses customer broadband accounts to create a neighbourhood-wide network for local devices.

It can be accessed by certain Amazon-branded devices up to 500m (0.3 miles) away if the home wi-fi is out of reach or not working.

But customers with a US-registered device only should have been contacted.

And UK customers who received Amazon’s email have told BBC News this was not the case.

“We recently began emailing customers with Echo devices registered in the US to give them more information about Amazon Sidewalk,” an Amazon spokeswoman said.

“This service will only be available in the US when it launches.

“We apologise for any confusion.”

Sidewalk was originally announced in 2019.

It means Amazon-branded security cameras and smart speakers can still function without a connection.

For US customers, the update will arrive in the form of a software update and owners of devices which can use it – including the Ring security camera and Amazon Echo – have to opt out of being part of it.

Only certain Amazon devices will be able to access it – not, for example, individual smartphones.

Amazon says in the email that Sidewalk “uses a small portion of your internet bandwidth” for the service.

“Sidewalk can also extend the coverage for Sidewalk-enabled devices, such as Ring smart lights and pet and object trackers, so they can stay connected and continue to work over longer distances,” it adds.

Security researcher Kevin Beaumont tweeted Amazon appeared to be offering only very limited access to other people’s broadband connections.

“It isn’t blindly allowing anybody to browse the internet from your connection,” he said.

Amazon has published a paper outlining Sidewalk’s security set-up.

However, Prof Alan Woodward, a cyber-security expert from Surrey University, said he thought people should not be added to the network by default.

“I think you should opt in rather than opt out of these things,” he said.

“It feels wrong not knowing what your device is connected to.”

Grammys 2021: Beyoncé, Taylor Swift and Dua Lipa lead nominations

Beyoncé, Taylor Swift and Dua Lipa lead the nominations for the 2021 Grammy Awards.

Beyoncé leads the field, with nine nominations overall, including four for Black Parade, a protest anthem released at the height of the Black Lives Matter protests this summer.

Swift, with six nods, could win album of the year for a record-breaking third time with her lockdown album Folklore.

Dua Lipa also picked up six nominations for the disco-tinged Future Nostalgia.

The British star, who was named best new artist by the Grammys two years ago, was also on hand to read out some of the nominees – including best children’s album and best historical album – in an online livestream.

Rapper Roddy Ricch also tied with Swift and Lipa on six nominations, the majority of which recognised his hit single The Box, which spent 11 weeks at number one earlier this year.

However, there was disappointment for R&B star The Weeknd, who failed to pick up any nominations, despite having the biggest-selling album of 2020 in the US.

The star, who is due to perform at the Super Bowl half-time show in February, had been expected to dominate the main categories.

There was better news for Billie Eilish, who picked up multiple nominations for her single Everything I Wanted, as well as her Bond theme No Time To Die.

The 18-year-old also made history earlier this year by becoming the first female artist to win all four of the Grammys main categories – best new artist, song of the year, record of the year and best album.

The nominees in the main four categories were:

Record of the year

Song of the year

Album of the year

Best new artist

British nominees included Harry Styles – picking up his first ever Grammy nominations for his solo album Fine Line in the pop categories. His previous band, One Direction, were consistently overlooked by the Grammys despite their international success.

Coldplay were listed in the best album category for their eighth album Everyday Life, while Mercury Prize-winner Michael Kiwanuka was nominated for best rock album and Laura Marling was listed alongside the late Leonard Cohen in the best folk album category.

Beyoncé’s nine nominations increased her historic lead as the Grammys’ most-nominated female artist ever. She now has 79 nominations, tying her with Sir Paul McCartney for the second-most nominations of all time.

Ahead of her are Thriller producer Quincy Jones, and her husband Jay-Z, who both have 80.

Three of Beyoncé’s nominations came for a guest verse on Savage (Remix) – the breakout hit by fellow Texan musician Megan Thee Stallion. Megan, whose real name is Megan Pete, also picked up a coveted slot in the best new artist category.

“What? Who me? Oh my God!” said the star as the nominations were revealed.

Korean band BTS scored their first musical nomination – with the single Dynamite gaining attention in the best group performance category (the band had previously been cited for the obscure ‘best album packaging’ award).

And rapper Pop Smoke picked up a posthumous nomination for his hit single Dior.

Many of the nominees are far from being household names, with retro rock band Black Pumas and multi-instrumentalist Jacob Collier listed in the main categories.

There is also a notable presence for songs inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement – most notably H.E.R.’s moving ballad I Can’t Breathe, which is up for song of the year.

The 84 categories also threw up a few quirks. Alanis Morissette’s Jagged Little Pill – which won best album in 1996 – is now nominated in the best musical theatre album category, thanks to a Broadway show based on her landmark album.

And Kanye West finds himself in the best contemporary Christian music category, thanks to his devotional rap album Jesus Is King,

These are the first nominations to be announced since the Recording Academy updated its award categories and rules earlier this year.

Amongst the changes, it dropped the term “urban” as a way of describing music of black origin, to ensure the awards were “inclusive and reflect[ed] the current state of the music industry”.

The rules on voting were also tightened up following allegations of irregularities by the Academy’s former president, Deborah Dugan.

The latest winners will be announced at the 63rd Grammy Awards ceremony on 31 January, 2021. Comedian Trevor Noah will host the show, the Recording Academy announced.

“Despite the fact that I am extremely disappointed that the Grammys have refused to have me sing or be nominated for best pop album, I am thrilled to be hosting this auspicious event,” said The Daily Show presenter, who was previously up for best comedy album at the 2020 ceremony.

“I think as a one-time Grammy nominee, I am the best person to provide a shoulder to all the amazing artists who do not win on the night because I too know the pain of not winning the award.

“This is a metaphorical shoulder,” he added. “I’m not trying to catch Corona.”

Billy Barratt: Responsible Adult star honoured by International Emmys win

Billy Barratt is only 13 years old and he’s just become the youngest person to win an International Emmy.

On Monday, Billy won best actor for his performance in the hard-hitting BBC drama series Responsible Child.

And the drama itself, which tells the story of a young boy put on trial for the murder of his father, won the prize for best TV movie or miniseries.

Speaking in his school lunch hour on Tuesday, Billy said he was “honoured and very happy”.

The ceremony was conducted virtually, hosted by veteran US TV, film and stage actor Richard Kind, known for Mad About You and Hereafter.

“Hello and welcome to the first, and hopefully the last virtual International Emmy Awards!” Kind said, raising a glass of champagne to viewers.

The other big winners on the night were Glenda Jackson, who won best actress for Elizabeth Is Missing, based on Emma Healey’s best-selling novel.

It tells the story of an elderly woman suffering from dementia while struggling to solve a murder mystery – a role which previously earned Jackson a Bafta.

Netflix won best drama series for its Indian programme Delhi Crime, while Brazilian show Nobody’s Looking took the best comedy award.

Billy was watching the ceremony at home with his family and his win came as a big shock, he told BBC News from his stage school Sylvia Young.

“They were playing the clips and I was watching and saying, ‘They’ve won’, and was getting ready to clap and then they said ‘Billy Barratt’ and I was so confused. My whole family was like, ‘Oh, my god’, so it’s very exciting.

“And it’s kind of crazy (to be the youngest winner), I don’t know what to think about it.

“But my teachers and the other students are all really supportive and really nice about it and happy for me.”

Responsible Child was a one-off BBC drama that was shown in December last year.

It followed 12-year-old Ray who, along with his 23-year-old older brother Nathan, was arrested for murdering their abusive stepfather.

Both are tried as adults, as the minimum age of criminal responsibility in England and Wales is 10 and the series explores the issues surrounding the law.

Billy played the central role of Ray and his brother Nathan was played by James Tarpey. It was a tough part for a 12-year-old but Billy said he had plenty of help.

“I had a lot of people around me like the director, Kudos [the production company], the BBC, all my cast mates, they were all really supportive and in between takes it was all fun and jokes, trying to keep things as light as possible.

“We had an acting coach and she was really good and she told us how to get in and out of character and leave Ray onset and get back to our lives when we went home.”

Responsible Child was loosely based on the real life case of 14-year-old Jerome Ellis and his older brother Joshua, 23. Both said they killed their stepfather because he was abusive and had previously threatened to kill Joshua, who struggled with depression.

It also featured Owen McDonnell (Killing Eve), Shaun Dingwall (Noughts and Crosses, Top Boy), Debbie Honeywood (Sorry We Missed You, Vera) and Angela Wynter (EastEnders, Les Miserables).

Billy said making the drama was particularly “challenging” at times, especially one of the last scenes.

“Ray is having a freak out and noticing what he’s done and that particular scene was very powerful and I had to take a minute afterwards and everyone sat down and had a think about it and readjusted.

“It was all very challenging and it is a true story so if I got it wrong I would have offended quite a lot of people. That was quite hard.”

Billy has also starred in The White Princess and Blinded By The Light.

Two days of Billy’s week is taken up with learning acting, dancing and singing whilst the other three are for academic work.

Once he’s finished at Sylvia Young, Billy says he hopes to go the London Screen Academy, which teaches everything about film-making, including directing, lighting, producing and costume design alongside acting.

And his dream is to star in an action film and also a comedy.

Billy Barrett: Responsible Adult star honoured by International Emmys win

Billy Barrett is only 13 years old and he’s just become the youngest person to win an International Emmy.

On Monday, Billy won best actor for his performance in the hard-hitting BBC drama series Responsible Child.

And the drama itself, which tells the story of a young boy put on trial for the murder of his father, won the prize for best TV movie or miniseries.

Speaking in his school lunch hour on Tuesday, Billy said he was “honoured and very happy”.

The ceremony was conducted virtually, hosted by veteran US TV, film and stage actor Richard Kind, known for Mad About You and Hereafter.

“Hello and welcome to the first, and hopefully the last virtual International Emmy Awards!” Kind said, raising a glass of champagne to viewers.

The other big winners on the night were Glenda Jackson, who won best actress for Elizabeth Is Missing, based on Emma Healey’s best-selling novel.

It tells the story of an elderly woman suffering from dementia while struggling to solve a murder mystery – a role which previously earned Jackson a Bafta.

Netflix won best drama series for its Indian programme Delhi Crime, while Brazilian show Nobody’s Looking took the best comedy award.

Billy was watching the ceremony at home with his family and his win came as a big shock, he told BBC News from his stage school Sylvia Young.

“They were playing the clips and I was watching and saying, ‘They’ve won’, and was getting ready to clap and then they said ‘Billy Barrett’ and I was so confused. My whole family was like, ‘Oh, my god’, so it’s very exciting.

“And it’s kind of crazy (to be the youngest winner), I don’t know what to think about it.

“But my teachers and the other students are all really supportive and really nice about it and happy for me.”

Responsible Child was a one-off BBC drama that was shown in December last year.

It followed 12-year-old Ray who, along with his 23-year-old older brother Nathan, was arrested for murdering their abusive stepfather.

Both are tried as adults, as the minimum age of criminal responsibility in England and Wales is 10 and the series explores the issues surrounding the law.

Billy played the central role of Ray and his brother Nathan was played by James Tarpey. It was a tough part for a 12-year-old but Ray said he had plenty of help.

“I had a lot of people around me like the director, Kudos [the production company], the BBC, all my cast mates, they were all really supportive and in between takes it was all fun and jokes, trying to keep things as light as possible.

“We had an acting coach and she was really good and she told us how to get in and out of character and leave Ray onset and get back to our lives when we went home.”

Responsible Child was loosely based on the real life case of 14-year-old Jerome Ellis and his older brother Joshua, 23. Both said they killed their stepfather because he was abusive and had previously threatened to kill Joshua, who struggled with depression.

It also featured Owen McDonnell (Killing Eve), Shaun Dingwall (Noughts and Crosses, Top Boy), Debbie Honeywood (Sorry We Missed You, Vera) and Angela Wynter (EastEnders, Les Miserables).

Billy said making the drama was particularly “challenging” at times, especially one of the last scenes.

“Ray is having a freak out and noticing what he’s done and that particular scene was very powerful and I had to take a minute afterwards and everyone sat down and had a think about it and readjusted.

“It was all very challenging and it is a true story so if I got it wrong I would have offended quite a lot of people. That was quite hard.”

Billy has also starred in The White Princess and Blinded By The Light.

Two days of Billy’s week is taken up with learning acting, dancing and singing whilst the other three are for academic work.

Once he’s finished at Sylvia Young, Billy says he hopes to go the London Screen Academy, which teaches everything about film-making, including directing, lighting, producing and costume design alongside acting.

And his dream is to star in an action film and also a comedy.

Archie Lyndhursts parents say final farewell to dearest boy

The funeral of actor Archie Lyndhurst took place on Monday, nine weeks after the 19-year old CBBC star died.

Archie, who was the son of Only Fools and Horses actor Nicholas Lyndhurst, was best known for playing Ollie Coulton in the comedy show So Awkward.

His mum Lucy Lyndhurst wrote on Monday: “Tonight at 6pm Nick and I shall be with him in a tiny chapel to send him on the first part of his next journey.”

The coroner’s report on the cause of death is yet to be published.

Posting on Instagram, Archie’s mum added: “We still have no answer as to what happened but wait patiently for the report to be written up in the next 10 weeks.”

In a statement issued just after Archie died, Nicholas said he and Lucy were “utterly grief stricken and respectfully request privacy”.

It is with the heaviest heart that I write this post. Nine weeks ago our dearest boy Archie was taken from us way too early. We still have no answer as to what happened but wait patiently for the report to be written up in the next 10 weeks.

The pain of our loss is beyond anything we have ever felt before, and wouldn’t wish upon anyone. Archie was, and remains our absolute world. He was the most beautiful extraordinary human being we have ever known. To have him as our son has been nothing but an utter joy and honour.

Tonight at 6pm Nick and I shall be with him in a tiny chapel to send him on the first part of his next journey. If you get a moment maybe you’d like to light a candle or take a minute just to remember him.

We’ve never known anyone live like Archie. He cherished and absorbed every moment he had. Until we meet again our darling magical boy. We will love you forever and ever and will be forever grateful for choosing us to be your parents. We were beyond lucky.

Thank you for every smile, hug, laugh, conversation – we loved them all. Your kindness and generosity knew no bounds. You were the best teacher we ever had. We miss you every minute of every day. As you would say my darling, “In a bizzle.” “Love You.”

Archie began his acting career at the Sylvia Young Theatre School at the age of 10. In 2013, his father Nicholas told the BBC that his son had inherited the “acting gene”.

Archie appeared in So Awkward, a sitcom following the lives of a group of friends in secondary school, from its first series in 2015.

Nicholas appeared alongside his son in a 2019 episode of the programme.

Archie’s other roles included recurring appearances as a younger incarnation of comedian Jack Whitehall in various TV programmes.

These included BBC Three sitcom Bad Education, in which he was seen as a younger version of Whitehall’s Alfie Wickers character.

Im A Celebrity: Do the contestants rehearse Bushtucker trials?

Reading some recent news reports, you might think ITV should change the name of its hugely popular series to I’m A Celebrity, Let Me Rehearse This Trial Before We Start Filming.

A story in The Sun suggested the campmates (castlemates?) are allowed to practise their Bushtucker trials before having to do them on camera.

This understandably sparked questions from viewers, as well as some previous contestants on the show, who said the same luxury was not extended to them during their time in camp.

So what’s the truth? The explanation lies somewhere in the middle.

“Con of the Castle” was The Sun’s rather amusing front-page headline when the newspaper broke this story on Tuesday.

The paper reported celebrities spend time learning about the trial before the cameras start rolling. The report was careful to point out, however, that these are not full-blown run-throughs as you might imagine them.

For example, the celebrities do not have cockroaches and fish guts dropped on them during rehearsals the way they do in the real thing. Instead, a brief reconnaissance gives the celebrities a chance to get to grips with the props and learn about the mechanics of a trial.

Often, the contestants need to know how certain tools and items work before they can use them. Think of the female contestants’ recent Bar-Baric trial involving a complicated sequence of padlocks and keys. Likewise, Mo Farah’s attempts to access a series of chambers in Fort Locks. Jordan North’s Trapped Door challenge saw him lie flat on a cart and pull himself along a tunnel using a rope.

All of these trials require the celebrities to understand the materials they’re going to be working with before they actually attempt them. A technical run-through gives them a chance to get their bearings.

An insider on the show pointed out: “Endless trials all resulting in celebrities getting stuck on intricacies such as locks and keys would make [viewers] switch off. They don’t get a warm-up, per se, but are told and shown what they need to do to wriggle out of specific parts of trials.

“They are told what the rules are, what to expect, and ultimately how to beat it. Viewers would much rather see contestants succeeding than failing on a technicality.”

In a statement to BBC News, a spokesman for I’m A Celebrity added: “Contestants are told the instructions of a trial and producers ensure that they understand what is required of them in line with our health and safety procedures. Any suggestion of run-throughs or practising is incorrect.”

However, The Sun also spoke to Kim Woodburn, a previous contestant on the show. She was shocked by the story about rehearsals, telling the paper: “This isn’t the jungle – it’s an absolute farce. It’s a cheat. I am truly appalled.”

This reaction suggests celebrities haven’t always had the option of running through the trial beforehand. But Woodburn took part in the 2009 series, quite some time ago, so it’s likely protocols have changed over the last decade.

It’s also worth noting this year’s series is in a new location with a new format for the trials, which brings us to the second question:

It probably hasn’t escaped your notice that this year’s series is taking place in a Welsh castle rather than an Australian jungle.

It also probably hasn’t escaped your notice that all the trials so far have taken place indoors and in darkness.

But why is that the case? It may not be Australia, but even in the winter months Wales still gets sunlight, right?

Well, here’s how it works. Ant and Dec gather the celebrities together to announce who the unlucky celebrity is that the public have voted to do the next trial. This is normally done live at the end of the episode.

But the celebrities barely have any time to be scared, as they’re whisked off to do the trial almost immediately.

This year, the chosen campmates stay up late at night, after the show has come off air, in order to film the trial.

As a result, all of the other contestants also have to stay up until they return, so they can greet their castlemate and find out how the trial went.

The main reason for doing this is simply that the show’s production team want to leave as much time as possible to edit footage together for the following evening’s episode.

If they had to wait until the next morning to shoot the trials, they’d be in a tight race against time to make sure all the footage was edited together and cut down to the correct length in time for the 9pm broadcast.

That’s not to say we don’t see footage that’s been filmed during daylight hours. Some tasks have taken place during the day – such as the Castle Coin challenge which saw Jordan and Ruthie separating and organising a herd of ducks.

Bear in mind that when the show is filmed in Australia, the bit where Ant & Dec announce which celeb is doing the trial happens first thing in the morning for them, due to the time difference.

That allows them to film the trial during daylight hours, while the UK is fast asleep.

But staying on Greenwich Mean Time this year means the celebrities have to film the trials during the night, which is why no trial so far has taken place outdoors or even in daylight.

Jordan North is terrified enough as it is, the poor lad doesn’t need sub zero night-time outdoor British temperatures to make things more difficult.

I’m a Celebrity continues nightly on ITV until 4 December.

Richard Huckle: Prisoner jailed over poetic justice murder

A psychopathic prisoner who murdered paedophile Richard Huckle in an act of “poetic justice” has been sentenced to a minimum of 34 years in jail.

Paul Fitzgerald, 30, assaulted and strangled Huckle in a 78-minute attack in his cell at HMP Full Sutton East Yorkshire in October 2019.

Fitzgerald said afterwards he wanted to cook and eat parts of Huckle’s body.

Sentencing him at Hull Crown Court, Mr Justice Lavender said he had been acting out his fantasies.

“You are a psychopath and you derive pleasure from fantasising about raping, torturing, killing, and even eating others,” Mr Justice Lavender said.

“On this occasion you derived pleasure from acting out your fantasies.”

The court heard Fitzgerald went into Huckle’s cell and tied him up.

He then raped him and assaulted him with various weapons before strangling him with an electrical cord.

Mr Justice Lavender said: “You intended to rape and kill Mr Huckle and, if possible, cook parts of him and eat them.

“You did this for your own pleasure and also to inflict what you called poetic justice on a convicted paedophile.”

The court heard that Fitzgerald, who suffers from psychopathy, anti-social personality disorder and gender identity disorder, has previous convictions for violent and sexual offences, starting from the age of 13 and including the false imprisonment of a female prison officer.

Fitzgerald, who appeared at the hearing by video link, was given a life sentence and must serve at least 34 years in jail.

Huckle, 33, from Ashford, Kent, was given 22 life sentences in 2016 after admitting 71 charges of sex abuse against up to 200 Malaysian children aged between six months and 12 years.

No guarantees for leaseholders over cladding removal costs

The government must make clear how it will protect leaseholders from having to pay towards removing flammable cladding from their homes, MPs say.

The Commons housing committee said it was alarmed some individuals would be liable for correcting historical defects under proposed legislation.

It said a £1.6bn government fund set up after the Grenfell fire was inadequate to cover the cost of repairs needed.

The government said it was looking at “developing affordable solutions”.

After 72 people died in the Grenfell Tower fire in 2017, the government pledged safe alternatives to dangerous cladding would be provided on all buildings in England taller than 18 metres by last June.

Despite £1bn in new funding being announced in March’s Budget, a report in September found that only 155 out of 455 high-rise buildings with similar cladding to Grenfell had had it replaced.

Appearing before MPs last month, housing minister Lord Greenhalgh said progress had been slower than he would have liked but insisted work would be under way on all buildings covered with aluminium composite material by the end of the year.

Answering questions about the government’s draft Building Safety Bill, he also indicated leaseholders would be liable for “some costs” where owners would not pay and were not required to do so under the terms of their leases.

The government, he said, was determined to ensure the sums involved were fair and affordable and those affected could still continue to live in their properties.

But MPs, who have been scrutinising the draft legislation, said this was not good enough and ministers must provide certainty that leaseholders would be protected before the bill was introduced in earnest in Parliament.

The cross-party committee said the government should foot the bill for the work in the short term and “develop mechanisms” to recover costs from those responsible for historic failures in construction and maintenance.

It warned there was a risk that freeholders could seek to recover the cost of historic remedial work through the Building Safety Charge, which it said was designed to support forward-looking fire safety measures.

“Leaseholders should not be expected to foot the bill for failures that were not of their making,” said Clive Betts, the Labour MP who chairs the committee.

“This has dragged on far too long now and the government must accept that it will have to step in to cover the cost in the short term.

“But we are equally clear in stating that this should be the first step ahead of establishing robust mechanisms to ensure that those who are responsible for fire safety failures finance their remediation.”

It has been estimated that replacing unsafe cladding on buildings will cost £4bn in London alone.

Ministers have said the legislation – combined with a separate proposed law on fire safety – will deliver the biggest changes to building safety for nearly 40 years, ensuring greater accountability in law for the upkeep of buildings and enforcement of safety obligations.

The committee said there was a lack of detail in key areas and more safeguards were needed, including a central register of building safety managers and more rigorous regulation of construction products.

Responding to the committee, a housing department spokesperson said: “Our Building Safety Bill will implement the biggest improvements to the building regulatory system in almost 40 years – ensuring residents are safer in their homes.

“We are looking at developing affordable solutions where needed and will provide more details in due course.”

England star Grealish admits careless driving

England footballer Jack Grealish has admitted two counts of careless driving.

The Aston Villa captain, 25, was charged with driving offences relating to two incidents this year.

The first was an accident involving his Range Rover in Dickens Heath, near Solihull, during lockdown on 29 March.

Court documents released before the hearing at Birmingham Magistrates’ Court revealed a further incident near Villa’s training ground on 18 October.

Grealish, of Barnt Green, Worcestershire, was accused of driving without due care and attention on Bodymoor Heath Road – the site of his club’s training complex in north Warwickshire – as well as on the M42 and the A446 on the same day.

The court heard he was seen tailgating other vehicles on the M42 and driving his Range Rover at 98 mph by police observing him in an unmarked vehicle.

He did not appear in court but entered his two guilty pleas through his lawyer.

Before the earlier incident in March, Grealish had issued a video appeal for people to stay at home to protect the NHS and save lives.

Two vehicles – a Citroen van and a Mercedes – were damaged in the accident, and as well as driving carelessly the footballer was charged with failing to stop at the scene and also failing to report it.

The footballer denied the two other charges, and the Crown Prosecution Service offered no evidence, so they were dismissed.

The court heard that Grealish, who already has six points on his licence for a 2018 speeding offence, could not attend court for sentencing, which was adjourned until 15 December.

District Judge John Bristow said the existing penalty points meant he could be at risk of a driving ban.