Two arrests at Christian tearoom that refuses to close

Two arrests at Christian tearoom that refuses to close

Two men have been arrested at a tearoom and Christian bookshop that has refused to close under Covid-19 regulations.

Owners of the Mustard Seed in Gedling, Nottinghamshire, cited Magna Carta and common law as reasons to stay open.

On Saturday police officers went to the cafe after reports of a gathering of “40 to 50 people” at the cafe.

Officers arrested the two men for refusing to give their details when officers attempted to fine each of them £200.

Nottinghamshire Police said officers had attended the premises at 13:45 GMT on Saturday to support Gedling Borough Council “after reports the cafe was continuing trading”.

Officers went back to the cafe in Main Road at 16:20 GMT and saw the business was “locked with a large number of people inside”.

Chief Inspector Rob Shields said: “Two men refused to disperse and refused to give their details to be issued with fixed penalty notices so they were arrested.”

Previously the owner of the business has told the BBC she would not shut her business, despite the fact non-essential businesses in England have been ordered to shut until December.

Signs in the window say the shop is “under the jurisdiction of common law”, and under article 61 of Magna Carta: “We have a right to enter into lawful dissent if we feel we are being governed unjustly.”

The owner, who would not give her full name, said: “I’m not doing this because I’m a rebel.

“I don’t believe what I am doing is unlawful. I’m standing up for what is right and moral.”

She added she did not believe the government’s figures on infection and death rates.

The shop is one of a number of businesses that have cited “Magna Carta” and “common law” as reasons for remaining open.

Although the 800-year-old document is an important part of legal history, only four clauses are still relevant, according to the Parliament website.

These do not include clause 61.

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